Raw Dog Diary 11/12/17

Another busy week but we’re making progress! On tap for this week is:

  • Unconventional oils such as black seed and CBD
  • Colloidal silver

Along with at least 15 other things that I’m currently researching.

It’s been a lot of computer time for Jersey Girl to endure but I’ve been doing better with the walks! It’s gorgeous out now so we do an hour minimum. It’s no where near the exercise we used to get but it’s better than it was!

The biggest news this week was that we finally found a holistic vet! They all seem so busy I was afraid we’d never get an appointment, but we finally got one for the end of the month. It’s good timing because I really want to change her heart worm pill and that’s usually when she takes it. I love living in Florida but the heartworm meds are a problem. I am 100% holistic except for this and I hate that. I’m really praying for some answers! I’m also interested in seeing her most recent blood work. I finally got a glucose/keytone reader (that we’ve yet to use lol) but that’s not my primary concern, so hopefully we’ll have a good experience with this new vet!

She’s finally being open minded and eating all of her meals!! For a while it was only the farmers market items but now it’s everything and I am so thrilled!

I’m starting official classes in canine nutrition soon so I am probably going to be blogging less but hopefully I’ll also have a lot more to share!

Best wishes to you and your fur family and love always,

Jeanne & Jersey Girl

Golden Paste

If you’ve been doing much searching through dog supplements lately, there’s a good chance you’ve run across golden paste at some point. So,

What is Golden Paste?

For the most part, golden paste aka golden milk, is just a fast way of saying: Turmeric made into an absorbable form. This means its ready to serve because its already been combined with the ingredients necessary for maximum absorption.

Way back when, I used to have to mix it in with other ingredients every time I made my dog a meal. Now I save huge amounts of time by making a whole lot of it and sticking the excess in the freezer. You can even pre-portion using ice cube trays! I usually just use a measuring spoon, but either way, is super easy and convenient!

What is Golden Paste Good For?

Golden Paste, or turmeric, is good for many different reasons. Most commonly, it is used to reduce pain and inflammation. This is because it is a natural and effective anti-inflammatory. The reason this is the number one reason for so many people is due to the drastic increase in joint problems in dogs today. Dogs as young as 2 are being diagnosed with arthritis at an alarming rate. Diet is mostly responsible for this, but regardless of the reason, the pain level can be debilitating. For many dogs, this paste replaces the need for any medication! This simple golden paste has improved the quality of life for these dogs so much that is has gotten the attention of a lot of people. Fortunately, we don’t have joint issues yet, but we still use golden paste daily for the other amazing benefits it provides:

  • It helps prevent arthritis because it is an anti-inflammatory
  • It helps prevent and even treat cancer
  • Heart health because it prevents blood clots from forming
  • It aids in digestion
  • It protects the liver from toxins
  • Its a powerful antioxidant, slows aging and increases lifespan
  • Improves memory and healthy brain function

Dogs That Should Avoid Using Turmeric:

  • Dogs with diabetes
  • Dogs that are prone to kidney stones
  • Dogs taking drugs for acid indigestion or who take aspirin
  • Dogs getting ready to have surgery

*Water should always be fed with turmeric to reduce chances of constipation and all dogs should start with low level doses and work their way up to prevent diarrhea.

In my article just on turmeric, I go into further detail about the benefits of turmeric for dogs. These are just a few.

*And I almost forgot, one of the best parts of this recipe is, you can eat it too! Turmeric is just as good for people! I just put some on a spoon and mix it with honey but it can also be added to recipes and many different foods to add flavor!

How Do You Make Golden Paste?

This is the BEST part! It is so easy! For a very simple and basic paste, all you need is:

  • Turmeric powder
  • Coconut Oil
  • Ground black pepper
  • Water

That is literally ALL that you really need to make a fabulous golden paste. I personally also add:

  • Bone Broth
  • Ceylon Cinnamon

I do this for a few different reasons. One is to add additional healthy nutrients and fats from the bone broth. I also find that it helps a lot with the consistency of my paste. The second, is that the cinnamon prevents breath odor afterwards. The smell is most commonly related to cat pee, and quite frankly, this is just not pleasant. The cinnamon takes care of that immediately!

*It is important to note here that it is crucial to use ceylon cinnamon. This is because cassia cinnamon (the most common) contains a toxin called coumarin. This could have a significantly negative effect on a dogs liver. The added ceylon cinnamon on the other hand is full of a long list of added benefits including:

  • It is an excellent source of manganese. Manganese helps activate enzymes that are essential to building healthy bones. These enzymes also aide in metabolism.
  • It is a very good source of dietary fiber, iron and calcium.
  • It helps lower cholesterol
  • Helps control blood sugar
  • Help control yeast (prevent candida)
  • It is anti-bacterial, anti-microbial, anti-fungal, and an e-coli fighter
  • Prevents gum disease
  • It is an antioxidant

Used in small doses, these effects are minimal but still a good reason to include some in the batch!

I should also mention, some of the reasons for adding bone broth. 

  • Joint health (contains glucosamine, chondroitin and hyaluronic acid)
  • Liver detox
  • Digestive health
  • Immune system health
  • Rich source of nutrients, amino acids, protein, vitamins and minerals

For an easy recipe on how to make bone broth and some of its additional benefits, I wrote about this here.

Golden Paste Recipes:

There are a TON of variations on these, but two that I find to be the most basic and reliable are:

Small Batch

  1. 1/2 C Organic Turmeric Powder (organic is higher in curcumin which is the active ingredient
  2. 1 – 1 1/2 C filtered water
  3. Mix together in a pan over medium/low heat for about 10 minutes or until the mixture thickens (if too thick or watery you can adjust the water or turmeric levels to smooth it out)
  4. Turn off heat and add: 1 1/2 tsp freshly ground organic black pepper (NEVER table pepper) and 1/4 C organic coconut oil (optional: also add 1 tsp ceylon cinnamon and instead of using 1/4 C coconut oil you can add 2 tbs coconut oil and 2 tbs bone broth)
  5. Mix everything together or blend with a whisk and your DONE!

This should be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two weeks.

Large Batch

Now, I also make bigger batches with:

  1. 6 C water brought to a boil
  2. 3 C turmeric added in slowly while stirring
  3. 1 C coconut oil
  4. 1 C bone broth, mix in well
  5. 2 tbs ceylon cinnamon, 3 tbs fresh ground black pepper
  6. Mix well until paste is smooth
  7. Store

*Ginger can also be added to improve taste.

This lasts me a very long time and I love that! This is because it does not take a lot of this per meal to make an impact.

How to Use Golden Paste

It’s important to know that turmeric leaves the body quickly, so if you feed your dog twice a day it’s always best to split doses between both meals.

Feeding guidelines vary because every dog and condition is different, but general guidelines are:

Added to meals or mixed with some kefir or plain yogurt:

Start with:

1/4 tsp per day for small dogs

1/2 tsp per day for medium dogs

3/4 tsp per day for large dogs

1 tsp per day for very large dogs

Over time, as your dogs system adjusts, you can start doubling these amount up to 3 times. My dog is 25 lbs and we use about 1 tsp per day, but every dog is different. For dogs using it for pain management, they might need slightly more, so it’s always best to ask your vet.

You can also buy turmeric in supplements. Just be sure to check the ingredients (black pepper or piperine is crucial) and feed with an oil for absorption. It’s also good to check before adding it, that your dog isn’t already taking supplements that contain turmeric in them (this could cause diarrhea).

The Honest Kitchen also makes a ready to go version of this already combined with bone broth. They also have a great selection of other instant bone broths.

Below are some additional quick references and recipe guides. All of them are super easy and absolutely worth a try!

Turmeric_dog_diagramturmeric-paste-recipeTurmeric-Info-1dougs-turmeric-paste-golden-paste-for-dogs-recipe-and-humans-75156061389421.large

 

Colostrum For Dogs!

What is Colostrum?

Colostrum is the pre-milk fluid that comes from the mammary glands of humans, cows and other mammals during the first few hours after giving birth, before regular nursing milk is produced.

It contains life-supporting immune and growth factors, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, and antibodies that fight disease-causing agents such as bacteria and viruses.  It also contains essential nutrients, 17 amino acids, whole food building blocks and elements such as leptin, vitamins A and B12, and a broad spectrum of biologically active substances to support the immune, nervous, skeletal and endocrine systems.

It can benefit healthy animals as well as those that are extremely ill.

More specifically, bovine colostrum, or colostrum that comes from a cow, is a universal donor of colostrum. All mammals can gain benefits from using it, dogs and humans alike. It is the most commonly used source of colostrum for this reason, along with the fact that cows produce the most of it and it can be obtained humanely.

Due to factory farming, certain colostrum supplements may contain hormones, antibiotics, pesticides or even nuclear contamination. For this reason, source is hugely important. Also, there are many companies that sell transitional milk and call it colostrum, this will not cause damage, but it will not be nearly as helpful either.

Colostrum from pasture raised, grass fed cows has more beneficial enzymes that make it more easily absorbed into the system. This maximizes its benefits and also offers a more diversified immune source. The best form to receive colostrum is in a powder (water-soluble) and it should be prepared without excessive heat.

How Can My Dog Benefit From Taking Colostrum?

Because “colostrum contains all of the immune factors necessary for protecting a newborn from bacteria, allergens, toxins and viruses along with a balanced proportion of growth factors that are required for growing and healing” dnm, it is an enormous resource. It has been used in all types of medical models for centuries for treating, preventing and curing a list of ailments that is continuing to grow as time goes on.

Currently, the reason most people find out about colostrum is for immune system support or allergies, but it has had huge levels of success in treating things like:

Internally:

  • Auto-immune diseases
  • Heart disease
  • Joint problems and arthritis
  • Leaky gut
  • IBD
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Colitis
  • Absorption deficiencies
  • Pancreatitis
  • Candida (yeast overpopulation)
  • Thyroid problems
  • Allergies
  • And it is making huge advancements in treating and even curing cancer.

Externally:

  • Healing open wounds
  • Abscess
  • Dermatitis
  • Cysts
  • Insect bites
  • Ear infections
  • Gingivitis

Just to name a FEW ailments.

Some animals who have been treated for things prior to the addition of colostrum, were not helped until it was added to their diet, others were even able to eliminate the other treatment entirely.

Colostrum can be used as:

  • An antibiotic
  • A probiotic
  • To balance the thymus gland
  • To fight viruses, toxic buildup and destroy bacteria
  • To regulate the immune system
  • It has growth factors that speed wound healing, skin growth and cellular repair
  • Acts as an anti-inflammatory
  • It can protect against canine flu
  • Bordetella
  • Parvovirus
  • Leptospirosis
  • Lime disease and more

In short, colostrum helps repair cells all over the body and most importantly in the internal organs.

It contains all of the immune and growth factors necessary for life.

Colostrum is safe and inexpensive. It is also easy to administer and most dogs like the taste. I have yet to see a single down side that isn’t 100% source related. A woman that I admire very much, gave me insight into a source that comes from New Zealand. It is sustainable and ethically sourced. I’m sure that there are others but I think that this is so important in this case, not just for safety and benefits, but because of what these animals are giving us!

I was first introduced to colostrum when researching how to make my own organic dog toothpaste. I had no idea how lucky I was to stumble onto this. My dog and I are now both taking it and I could not be more grateful.

This is only a very brief insight into the amazing things that colostrum can do. If your dog has any problems whatsoever, it is absolutely worth asking your vet about adding some colostrum. It can’t hurt and has the potential to do so much good!

The colostrum we use is: New Zealand Colostrum

There are very concrete and definitive scientific reasons for all of these benefits. I did not attempt to try to digest the science on this one, it was just too far above my head, however This Article does this absolutely beautifully, if you are interested in learning more!

These are some general feeding guidelines. Every animal, use and product is different. This is just to give a very general idea for how much may be needed for a mostly health dog. I used this to help me know how much to purchase.

Gloria Dodd DVM recommends the following amounts:

  • 1/3 teaspoon powdered form/25 lbs body weight twice daily or:
  • Small dogs and cats –1 cap twice daily
  • Medium to large dogs- 2 caps twice daily

This recommended dosage is for one month minimum, then give colostrum as needed. It is most effective on an empty stomach, but it can also be given with a small amount of plain yogurt.

Currently, my dog only has ear infections but my immune system is a little more compromised, so we will update next month and let people know what we have found!

Titer Testing and the Dangers of Over-Vaccinating

As pet parents, it can be extremely overwhelming being in charge of so many decisions in regard to their health. The bottom line is we ALL want to do what’s best for them. The problem comes in when it’s so unclear what that is.

There are countless studies proving different schools of thought. Vets that stand strong on both sides and an enormous amount of information available on the internet with large communities of people backing both sides. This gets even more confusing when there are more than two sides.

I am an advocate for holistic medication and natural remedies first always, but I still believe there is a time and a place for conventional care. This puts me somewhere in the middle in most cases including vaccines.

TO TITER or NOT TO TITER That is the question!

When I first heard about titer Testing, my initial reaction was overwhelming gratitude. It felt like an answer to my prayers and an easy way to cut out most of our vaccines. After taking a step back, I looked into the other side’s stance to get more of a full picture. Things that sound too good to be true, usually are and my dog’s life could be at risk if I make rash decisions in either direction. This is a big decision, and I need to make an educated decision.

So, to start examining this more closely,

What is titer Testing?

Titer tests are a tool used by dog owners and veterinarians to help minimize the risks of both infectious diseases and unnecessary vaccinations.

According to veterinary doctor, Jean Dodds,

“A titer test is a simple blood test that measures a dog or cat’s antibodies to vaccine viruses (or other infectious agents). For instance, your dog may be more resistant to a virus whereas your neighbor’s dog may be more prone to it. Titers accurately assess protection to the so-called “core” diseases (distemper, parvovirus, hepatitis in dogs, and panleukopenia in cats), enabling veterinarians to judge whether a booster vaccination is necessary. All animals can have serum antibody titers measured instead of receiving vaccine boosters. The only exception is rabies re-vaccination. There is currently no state that routinely accepts a titer in lieu of the rabies vaccine, which is required by law.”

The benefits of using a titer test:

Dog’s that have been properly immunized early on almost always develop the required antibodies that prevent the illness for their entire lives. These tests prove their immunity and reduce their chances of being harmed by over-vaccinating. Furthermore, I have yet to see a single study proving that a titer test showed immunity when it wasn’t there. The only evidence I’ve seen of false results is when they tested low, and immunity was actually completely adequate. Titer tests have actually proven nothing but how incredibly stable they are. It is generally suggested to titer every 3 years however, after two consecutive positive tests, you can safely test even less or not at all. I’m a worrier so I’ll probably stay in the 3 year camp. There are countless examples of this being unnecessary, however I know what I need to do to sleep at night!

“Dr. Jean Dodds, DVM, is a pioneer in vaccine protocol studies. According to her research, at least 95% of dogs actually retain immunity against the viruses in question (Rabies, Distemper and Parvovirus) for YEARS after being vaccinated. She also discovered that “evidence implicating vaccines in triggering immune-mediated and other chronic disorders is compelling.”

I have looked and not seen one single example of this not being true.

Downsides to Titer Testing:

-Mainly, the cost, anywhere from $40-$200 depending on your vet.

-Titer tests can “miss” undetected immunities that are present, so you end up paying for the titer test + the unnecessary vaccine.

This is “because a titer only measures antibodies, not cell-mediated immunity, which is the real-world measure of protection. In fact, as I learned, pets can sometimes come up negative (unprotected) on the titers and still have plenty of perfectly protective, cell-mediated immunity.” Jean Dodds

-There is not a titer test for everything. Non core vaccines such as Canine leptospirosis, bordetella or Lyme disease vaccines only provide short-term protection. This significantly compromises their value first of all, and most reasons to give them have to do with life style. In most cases the benefits do not outweigh the risks, but a vet can assist with this. It’s a particularly important thing to pay attention to, because these are considered particularly dangerous. Two good references to assist in making this decision are Non core vaccines  And Necessary vaccines

-Depending on where you live, you might still need to legally do rabies. Some places allow the vet’s to makes this decision, others don’t.

This is something worth looking into because unlike the other vaccines, even just ONE single extra rabies shot can be life threatening.

*IF A DOG IS SICK or has a compromised immune system, they should NEVER be vaccinated. This could be extremely life threatening. Most vet’s should know this, but it’s very important to remember. Weather its something serious, a minor cold or even parasites, some vets may overlook this and exposing a dog to a virus at this time is never a safe thing to do.

Risks of over-vaccinating

From Dogs Naturally:

“When your dog is protected by the vaccines he’s already had, vaccinating him again does not make him “more immune”.

Most vaccines contain toxic chemicals.

One example is:

Thimerosal

This is a mercury based additive used as a preservative. Mercury toxicity is well known and repeatedly proven in studies. Yet it’s still contained in most veterinary vaccines today. Even some vaccines that claim to be thimerosal-free may still contain small amounts of thimerosal. That’s because it can be used in processing but not added as an ingredient, so the manufacturers don’t have to disclose it.”

More on this Here

There is no debate that the diseases these vaccines are designed to prevent are VERY serious. However, once a dog has been vaccinated as an adult, these vaccines become more of a threat than the diseases they are supposed to prevent.

Places such as Banfield are promoting vaccines every 6 months, with is currently being scrutinized by the national veterinary association because this is in NO way accurate and extremely dangerous.

Dogs Naturally reports that:

“Ronald D Schultz PhD proved decades ago that most dogs will be protected for many years (and probably for life) by one round of core vaccines as puppies – usually when they’re about 16 weeks old. So, after their puppy shots, most dogs don’t need to be re-vaccinated ever, let alone year after year after year.

Dr Schultz reports:

“The patient receives no benefit and may be placed at serious risk when an unnecessary vaccine is given. Few or no scientific studies have demonstrated a need for cats or dogs to be revaccinated.”

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA), the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) have announced publicly that annual vaccination is unnecessary and can be harmful.”

This hasn’t stopped Bannfield yet, but it really should.

Most other vet offices do not do this, but rather, recommend certain ones every certain number of years as per the AAHA guidelines. This is not legally required except for rabies and there is still no proof of this being necessary at all. It is a much more reasonable course of action thankfully, but not substantiated as being necessary or worth the risks.

Even when given more responsibly, most vets will tell you that vaccinations are very safe, and only minor side effects directly after administration may occur.

We know now, that this is not true. Vaccines are very hard on the immune system. Deadly vaccine reactions and lifelong chronic illness, including autoimmune diseases and cancer can and have been proven to occur.

The best source of complete benefit/risk analysis of some of these is HERE

Some examples of risks are:

  • “Those containing adjuvants, or chemicals that stimulate the immune system, have been linked to cancerous tumors known as fibrosarcomas.
  • The distemper vaccine has been strongly linked to joint disease and arthritis – two increasingly common chronic diseases in dogs.
  • The parvo vaccine has been linked to heart disease and can create a chronic form of the disease, the symptoms of which include chronic gastritis, hepatitis and pancreatitis, chronic diarrhea and food sensitivities.
  • Every lepto vaccine contains an aluminum adjuvant which causes cancer.
  • The risk of Vaccine Induced Autoimmune Disease is greater than the risk of lepto and the lepto vaccine carries a higher risk than most other vaccines.”

There are increasing studies being conducted today, and an overwhelming amount of evidence to support the dangers of continuing these vaccines.

Myths about vaccines:

  1. They prevent the intended disease 100%
  2. They lose effectiveness over time
  3. They can be made more effective by continued administration – revaccination does not mean more immunity
  4. Vaccinations work on every animal

Risks of not vaccinating

Almost every vet agrees that it’s a good idea to vaccinate puppies. Some say one additional booster is needed. Then it becomes murky. Some say the titer tests are not adequate but fail to show evidence of this being true. Others rather be “safe” than sorry but fail to consider the incredibly negative impacts of the vaccines themselves. Many think that the vet offices just want to make money or avoid interpreting titer results. Regardless of the reasoning, the arguments for continued vaccinations seem to be generated by fear and lack of information.

I looked deeply into this because I have a very active, social dog. She swims, plays in dog parks and is exposed to everything that these vaccines protect against. I wanted to be as sure as I could be before her next annual check up. I found nothing that made me believe that they were necessary.

Conclusion:

I am not going to waste my time getting my dog titer tested at our current vet. I am working very hard to find a new vet who can interpret these correctly, among other things. With someone who is educated on this, I can decided whether or not any additional vaccines are needed. My analysis of the not titer-testable vaccines is that she does not need them, but this is not a decision I would make on my own.

Some people will criticize me and say I’m exposing my dog to dangers by eliminating vaccines. Others will say I’m wasting my money on a test she doesn’t need, because it’s incomplete, and she doesn’t need any more vaccines regardless of the test. I have to be ok with this. Ultimately, it’s my decision. I often say on here that I’m not a vet. However, most of what I share comes from reading things written by doctors, and it still boils down to being a very personal decision. That’s the bottom line. We’re all just doing our best. This is the best of what I’ve found. If nothing else, I hope this helps bring the issue to attention. I know it’s one that I missed for a long time. I wish we could trust our vet but this is just another reason why it’s so important to find one that we do!

This guide offers some additional info.

My next battle, will be our monthly heat guard pill. This is not something I will discuss until after seeing a new vet. There is a TON of holistic resources for people, if they are interested in finding other methods. Because of where I live, I can’t take them away during cold weather months, so I’m stuck using something stronger than the alternative methods I have seen. I am not without hope however, and I hope to share some encouraging news on that in the next coming months!

This article explains my concerns regarding heart worm pills along with some alternatives for those who may be interested.

In the mean time, we do this annual Cleanse.

titer-test-584x276

Raw Dog Diary 11/4/17

Some things on the agenda for next week:

Titer testing for vaccines and Heart worm prevention

Also, how to safely serve fish

This week I got a bit off track from what I had originally planned to talk about. It happened organically, as I face new challenges making my own food. That being said, I’m looking forward to getting back to discussing food and supplements because I have about 30+ new topics to share about on that!

I got my new freezer set up today, and we’re making progress! Tomorrow is meal prep day and I’m very excited!

I’m still learning what Jersey likes so I won’t be making anything in bulk quite yet, but I look forward to the process! She amazes me daily and is doing so well on this food!

I’m still trying to track down a holistic vet. We have some time, but I really hope to see someone before her next comboguard (heart guard pill).

I’ll keep sharing info on that as I find it.

I really hope everyone is having a wonderful weekend! I don’t like it getting dark earlier now but …I’m super excited about the extra hour of sleep!! 😉

Love and Best wishes,

Jeanne & Jersey Girl

Natural Wound Care and the Dangers of Hydrogen Peroxide and Neosporin

Hydrogen peroxide and Neosporin are two of the most common household items in our medicine cabinets for treating wounds. While these may be fine for humans, they can actually be very dangerous and detrimental for treating animal wounds.

First, I must start by stating that I am not a vet. The information here is based on my own life experience and independent research. This is meant for minor cuts only. For anything more serious it is ALWAYS best to see a vet. This includes puncture wounds because while they may be small, they could be hazardous even if the animal that caused them had no known diseases.

Ok, so now back to minor cuts and why it’s not good to use hydrogen peroxide!

The number one reason for this is that while killing bacteria it also kills the body’s natural healing cells. These cells are called fibroblasts, and they are crucial to proper wound healing. The gratifying fizz effect is not only killing off bacteria but skin cells as well. In a pinch, it can be used for immediate attention but only when diluted. I would also flush with water afterwards because you definitely do not want your dog licking this!

How to properly clean a wound

  1. Stop the bleeding. Applying pressure with a piece of gauze or something like it should do this effectively. If this doesn’t work relatively quickly it’s time to get to the vet, immediately!
  2. Remove as much hair around the wound as you can with a simple pair of clippers (no razors). This will allow the area to heal faster undisturbed.
  3. Flush the area. Saline or even water is great for getting rid of dirt or debris. Pressurized washes are ideal. There are many “wound washes” but a saline eye wash will work just fine in a pinch. I just use a squeeze bottle with a pin hole opening and it works very well.
  4. Now it’s time to disinfect.

My favorite method is simply to continue with saline. Repeated flushes with warm water and saline until the area looks clean should be entirely adequate and making a saline solution couldn’t be easier. There are many methods out there. I use this one:

1. 1 cup of boiling water poured into a bowl

2. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt, stir to dissolve and leave it to cool.

It is always good to make a fresh solution each time you need it or one per day, but every two days would most likely be fine also.

Another method is

1. Using approximately one level teaspoonful (5 mls) of salt (or Epsom salts) 2. Added to two cups (500 mls) of water.

Both are effective.

I use this twice daily until the wound is healing, then once gently until it’s healed.

Another method that I’ve seen used in cases where wounds seem dirtier or when people just want extra peace of mind is:

Povidone iodine or Bentadine:

I am not a big fan of this but I do keep it in the house. It’s very important to remember to dilute it to a 1% solution. I wound use this in the beginning maybe but then switch to saline. (Also note that some animals can be allergic so it’s a good idea to test it before continued use.)

It is technically considered safe if an animal licks a small amount, so I am slightly more comfortable with this option.

The other commonly used wound care option is Chlorhexidine. I am not a fan of this. When used properly and in a solution form only (not a soap or scrub) it may be safe. If it is diluted to no more than .05% and made with “diacetate” salt and NOT “gluconate” salt, it can be an appropriate day 1 option. My biggest issue here is that it is 100% not safe to lick. It contains hibitane which is very hazardous when ingested and is an irritant to skin, eyes and nose when inhaled. I also have seen studies that show that repeated or prolonged exposure to chlorhexidine soap can cause serious organs damage. I know this is not a study done on the solution version but I still don’t like it.

Next, it’s time to

5. Dry the area and keep an eye on it.

Gauze bandages can help protect large wounds. Infection can happen at any stage so it’s important to keep checking.

6. Clean once or twice a day. You can gently massage it as it’s healing with a piece of saline soaked gauze. It is actually best to remove scab tissue during the healing process because it actually speeds up healing quite a bit. This doesn’t mean rip, which could cause more damage, but rather soaking and massaging until it’s ready to come off.

Aftercare

Ok, now it’s time to discuss

Neosporin

(Or polysporin)

I’ve had problems with Neosporin when treating myself because each and every time, my wounds got worse! I know a lot of people also use it on dogs, so I thought it was worth investigating.

First of all, it is made of petroleum jelly. Petroleum jelly originates from crude oil, which is toxic to skin. It also forms a film on the skin surface that slows down the healing process and prevents the wound from closing fast. Also, continued use of things containing antibiotics leads to stronger and more resistant bacteria. Then there’s the simple fact that most dogs will lick anything greasy, which creates additional trauma to the wound and prolongs healing. It is not healthy for them to ingest this either!

A lot of people prefer using nothing. In many cases this is the best method. (I stop the licking though at all costs because I know first hand this is always counterproductive to healing!)

For larger wounds that may need more care, I use a healing balm that I made myself. Colloidal silver is also wonderful. I’ve also tried plain old coconut oil and had great success! Although there are many great products on the market, I have learned the hard way not to just trust something because it says natural or organic. I still research the ingredients and one that I like a lot is resQ organics.

ResQ Organics (green label) makes an incredible product with manukora honey that I LOVE! It’s soothing, great for healing, safe to eat and helps heal any issue very fast!

Many people advise against the use of essential oils because they are not always safe when in contact with the blood stream. I support this entirely, when they are undisclosed, because it’s not worth the risk. However there are safe alternatives that can help relieve pain and speed up the healing process.

Healing Sprays And Rubs

For minor wounds, helichrysum, niaouli, sweet marjoram and lavender are all considered safe. (If you are unfamiliar with Helichrysum oil, it’s an antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal and an anti-inflammatory just to name a FEW of it’s qualities. It’s amazing, and very worth checking out!)

There are more safe and healthy oils but I have a recipe for a natural

wound care spray that is:

120 ml base oil (coconut, olive, almond, jojoba etc)

4 drops helichrysum oil

5 drops niaouli oil

5 drops sweet marjoram

10 drops lavender oil

This can be used directly on an open wound to clean and treat.

For AFTER the wound has closed, I have a natural disinfectant spray recipe that is also great for stings, bites, rashes and poison ivy. It is always best to use this in moderation and no more than one or two weeks max, but it can be a lifesaver!

240 mls water

5 drops eucalyptus oil

5 drops lemongrass

2 drops cinnamon

Shake well

For scar tissue (that can be problematic down the road) I use

30 mls sweet almond oil

1 drop bergamot oil

1 drop German chamomile oil

1 drop helichrysum oil

1 drop rose oil

1 drop patchouli oil

10 drops vitamin E oil

Combine all ingredients thoroughly and massage into healing scar tissue (I use this on myself as well)

For paw pad injuries:

Anti-inflammation and moisturizing wound care:

30 mls extra virgin coconut oil

2 drops rose hip oil

1-2 drops rose oil

1 drop helichrysum oil

Massage into paws as they heal from small cuts scratches or abrasions.

I used these and like them a lot but I can’t help but mention here my version of the gold standard, which is Dr. Dobias’ healing spray. The ingredients here along with resQ organics helped inspire my own healing balm. (I am holding off on sharing that recipe only because… quite frankly I lost it! We moved recently and I know that it is somewhere. When I find it I will make a separate post because I was blown away at how great it worked even on my own cuts!)

Dr. D.’s

Healing Spray

“BASED ON EUROPEAN TRADITION, MADE FROM THE FINEST HERBS

Calendula is used topically for healing wounds, acne, reducing inflammation, soothing irritated tissue and to control bleeding. It has antiviral, anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties.

Hydrastis (Goldenseal) is considered a great natural anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial herb and is often used to boost the medicinal effects of other herbs.

Witch Hazel has astringent properties and reduces inflammation and swelling by shrinking and contracting blood vessels back to their normal size. It is also used to treat acne, bruises and insect bites.

Yucca is used to treat skin lesions, sprains, inflammation and to stop bleeding. It is also beneficial in the treatment of arthritis and joint pain.

Skin Spray is non-toxic, all natural and contains no chemicals or preservatives. It can be used for the whole family – children, adults and all pets.”

So, there you have it! That’s how we treat minor wounds now and I can’t express enough how much better things heal! My dog recently lost a dew claw. It was bad! She even needed minor surgery. After the bandages came off, she kept reopening her wound, so I had to keep it covered. In the past I used prescription cleaners. This time, I went all natural (not against the vet’s advice) and it made SUCH a significant difference, I will never go back. We don’t take chances, we see our vet, but when it comes to managing small injuries, we finally have a plethora of solutions that work incredibly well for my whole family!

Facts about Pumpkin and Ways To Use Fresh Leftover Pumpkin!

Every fall we get pumpkins and save the seeds to roast. The ones we carve will spoil but the rest usually just go to waste. This is a shame because pumpkins are an incredible source of vitamins A and C, the antioxidant beta carotene, zinc, iron, soluble fiber and potassium.

*I should note that pumpkins can spoil quickly. Ones left outdoors may not be good options. This is the only time of year they are easy to get, so this isn’t really about recycling old pumpkins, but utilizing ones that were recently bought maybe right around Halloween. (I’d err on the side of caution and say no more than a week old.)

The first thing people always think of in terms of pumpkin is always treating issues related to digestion, but I assure you there is so much more!

Vitamin A is important for vision. Vitamin C aids in joint health and boosts the immune system. Beta carotene is beneficial to healthy aging. *The antioxidants from the carotenoid family (beta-carotene included) are considered especially useful because they are long acting and absorb more effectively into dog’s cell membranes. Zinc helps coat shine and health. Potassium is a blood electrolyte. It’s something to look out for if your dog has a kidney issue because often they need to limit potassium in their diet. Levels of potassium in the blood stream that are too high or too low are an indication of an underlying problem. (A good thing to look out for in a blood test.) In healthy dogs, potassium is great for muscle and blood vessel function as well as regulating the acidity of body fluids. It is also a great way to replace potassium lost during a bout of diarrhea. Soluble Fiber helps weight management because it slows digestion and helps dogs feel fuller longer. It also helps to regulate blood sugar and lower cholesterol.

A lot of people keep plain organic pumpkin around in case of tummy trouble because it’s so good at taking care of both constipation and diarrhea. This is because it absorbs water in cases of diarrhea and the high water content and fiber help the stool pass more effectively.

In cases of diarrhea, it’s important to remember that the diarrhea has a cause. When the body is trying to detox or get rid of something harmful, diarrhea is an effective method. It is very unpleasant but it has a purpose. Pumpkin may be good to help reduce symptoms but I would only use very minimal amounts. The fiber it contains is soluble, so it slows digestion and this is not good in detox. I would prefer to use the seeds in this case to aid in cleansing.

Pumpkin also doesn’t work to fix tummy troubles in every dog. Many do better with slippery elm for example (which I’ll discuss in an upcoming article). I personally like to let nature run its course. Diarrhea usually clears up quickly and if doesn’t, after a few days, it’s time to see the vet.

Dosing is also an important factor when adding pumpkin. Too much is not good and dogs don’t need a lot for it to be effective. The use determines the dose, however, it’s always good to ask your vet! I’ve seen 1 tbs to replace every 1/8c of food for weight loss and for stomach upset:

• 0-15 lbs dog: 1-2 tablespoon

• 15-35 lbs dog: 2-4 tablespoons

• 35 lbs dog or more: 2-5 tablespoons

Again these are just very general guidelines and every dog is different. I always err on the side of less especially in this case because it’s so high in carbohydrates.

Now for my favorite part, the seeds! The seeds are a great source of protein and fiber. They are also a natural dewormer. They contain an amino acid called cucurbitin which paralyzes things like parasites and tapeworms and helps them pass out of the system. The oils in them can help support urinary health, help treat kidney stones and aide with incontinence. They are also anti-inflammatory. The best way to use them is ground plain roasted (no salt).

For years I’ve been adding pumpkin to recipes for dog cookies and purées. It’s an easy thing to bake with and many dogs like the flavor. It never occurred to me to make my own because frankly, I had no idea how to cook a pumpkin… until now! This year I opted to get organic pumpkins for a few extra dollars, just so I could try to use them now, but any pumpkin should work just fine.

Because this is my first year trying, I used directions I found on-line by a woman named Kim Cromptom who had it looked at by a certified vet.

“Choose a small to medium size pumpkin and clean well, removing any dirt. Cook the cleaned pumpkin at 375 °F for 45-60 min (pumpkin should be soft). Remove pumpkin and allow it to sit for 5–10 minutes. Chop pumpkin in half, remove seeds and separate the skin from the flesh. Place hot pumpkin flesh in a food processor or mash by hand or with electric beaters.”

Pretty darn easy! I had no idea! I no longer have to buy expensive organic canned pumpkin because I plan to freeze it. Every holiday I love to make themed treats. I know carbs are not ideal for dogs but sometimes you just want to make something cute! This is a healthy way to do that. Whatever is left over I’ll keep around in case I want to add it to a purée. Below are some simple recipes but there are MANY many more and a quick google search will give you more options than you will know what to do with!

Easy Fall Themed Cookies

*Both of these recipes use natural peanut butter (no xylitol) however you can substitute this with bananas and they will come out just as good! I use all organic ingredients when I can. I also have two versions of each. One is with coconut flour (my favorite!) for grain-free and the other is for whole wheat. They are different because of differences in flour absorption but they are basically the same in flavor.

Whole-wheat recipe:

  • 2 1/2 C whole wheat flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 C pumpkin purée
  • 3 tbs natural peanut butter
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350 F
  2. Mix all ingredients together
  3. Roll thin and cut into desired shapes
  4. Spread out onto a greased cookie tray
  5. Bake for 30 min

(Thickness can affect cooking time so I start checking on them after about 25 min)

Coconut Flour (grain-free) recipe:

  • 1 cup of coconut flour
  • 4 eggs
  • 3/4 cup of pure pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 cup of natural peanut butter
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350 F
  2. Mix pumpkin, eggs and peanut butter in a large bowl
  3. Add in coconut flour and mix well
  4. Roll and cut into desired shapes and place on a greased baking sheet
  5. Bake for 20-25 min (cookie thickness may affect this so I start checking after 20 min)

* A great tip for both recipes is to add 1 tbs of raw honey for flavor and/or 1/2 teaspoon of ground cinnamon.

The good thing about these recipes is that they are basic and leave room for personalized added touches. I even hide vitamins in mine, they are great for that!

No-Bake Flour-free option:

  • 1/2 C natural peanut butter
  • 1 C natural pumpkin purée
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tbs raw honey

*optional: rolled oats, these help a lot with easy handling

  1. Mix all ingredients together
  2. Roll into balls (optional: lightly roll through rolled oats)
  3. Place on a parchment lined tray
  4. Place in the refrigerator for about an hour, just so they harden a bit
  5. Store in an air tight container in the refrigerator always (2 weeks max)

* In all cases pumpkin can be substituted with sweet potato, some dogs prefer the flavor.

Pupsicles

The size of your ice cube trays or silicone molds sort of determine the amounts here, but the amounts can be easily reduced or doubled.

To fill 1 large tray use:

  • 1 C pureed cooked or canned pumpkin and
  • 1 C pain yogurt (I use raw goats milk yogurt),

(you can also add a ripe banana if your pup likes them!)

  • Fill trays and freeze!

*You can also do this in a Kong

Simple Veggie purée

Trying to pick just one purée recipe is next to impossible because the options for these are endless. This is just one example. I encourage purees because of the ease of digestion and nutrient availability. I didn’t put organic before each item here but as always, organic is definitely the highest quality nutrition and safest option. I also always make sure to wash them.

(Tip: To help get my dog to eat her veggies I usually mix them up pretty well into the rest of her food and don’t give her too much per meal. About 1/4 C or less for a 25 lb dog. Many people also freeze them and their dogs like the crunch!) I also usually add some green Lipped mussels powder into my purées because unlike her other supplements, my dog really hates the taste of these!

  • One bag of baby spinach (at least 5 oz)
  • Two fresh red beet top greens
  • 1 chopped red beet
  • 5 leaves of kale
  • 5 stalks of parsley
  • 1 C puréed pumpkin
  1. Place all items in a blender or food processor (mine is small so I break the recipe in half and combine and stir at the end)
  2. Get to the finest level of purée that you can and

Done!

I’m no culinary expert, that’s for sure, but I hope this provides a good jumping off point! Best wishes and happy fall! Love Jeanne & Jersey Girl

The Truth About Garlic

Garlic has been on every “what not to feed” list for dogs that I’ve ever seen. Like most people, I just assumed this was correct and left it alone. That being said it was also in a TON of dog supplements that we see every day. At first, I just assumed that these supplement makers just somehow magically changed the deadly garlic into something safe and extracted the benefits, but this didn’t change the fact that any other garlic was still unsafe.

This literally could not be further from the truth.

The real reason garlic is on these lists is because (just like avocado) it can harm some animals but not most dogs. It’s added as a precaution if overdose occurs or if the dogs that shouldn’t have it have too much. It’s also on the list because of studies done exclusively on garlic extracts, excessive doses or garlic mixed with other things, NOT on normal amounts of fresh raw garlic.

The other reason people fear garlic is because garlic is part of the Allium family (along with onions). This means it contains aliphatic sulfides (propyldisulfide and thiosulphate to be exact) which can damage red blood cells. Because this damage is often without symptoms it can become a concern with prolonged use. HOWEVER, the actual AMOUNT of thiosulphate present is so much less than in onions, it’s often untraceable.

It’s a heated debate but the evidence of harm is severely lacking and in proper use cases, I haven’t seen a single piece of evidence proving any cellular damage whatsoever.

In my opinion all this means is that large amounts and pro-longed use are important guidelines to keep in mind but not reasons enough not to use it.

What dogs should not have garlic?

-Dogs with anemia or who are scheduled for surgery

-Dogs with a compromised digestive tract (it could exacerbate symptoms such as IBS or leaky gut)

-Dogs on certain medications (immune suppressants, heart medications etc.) The prescribing vet will know for sure.

-Dogs with diabetes

-Puppies

-Pregnant mothers

-Japanese dogs such as Shiba Inu’s and Akita’s (I know this sounds crazy) The reasons are still not 100% clear but it has to do with their digestive system and how they break down certain things.

In these cases, small amounts should still be no reason for concern, but if your worried it’s always best to call your vet!

What makes garlic so beneficial?

Why bother with an item that has been so controversial? Because it’s an absolute POWERHOUSE when it comes to benefits. People who have years of experience and success using it have a staggering number of explanations why. A few of them are listed here.

Garlic Properties and uses:

-Antibacterial, Anti-fungal, Anti-parasitic

-Immune system enhancer

-Detox – liver and digestive tract; breaks down waste before it enters the bloodstream

-Digestive enhancer – helps the body absorb nutrients, supports beneficial bacteria, eliminates harmful bacteria and balances the digestive system

-High in vital nutrients such as: vitamins A, C & B, Calcium, manganese, magnesium, selenium, germanium, amino acids, inulin, sulfur, zinc, potassium and phosphorus.

-Decreases cholesterol

-Improves circulation and organ function (especially lungs, large intestine, stomach and spleen)

-Prevents tumors

-Prevents blood clots and widens blood vessels

-Stimulates lymphatic systems to remove waste

-Cancer prevention and treatment – ongoing studies are proving this more and more!

-Natural tick, flea and mosquito repellant (after daily doses for at least 2 weeks)

-Dewormer

-Topically for Ear infections and ear mites

That’s a pretty big deal so now,

How to safely add Garlic to your dog’s diet:

-ONLY use fresh, organic WHOLE shelled garlic from a trusted source (never jarred or dried because this voids the value)

-Always peel and mince, cut or crush directly before use (it’s suggested to then let it stand for 5-15 minutes at room temperature before serving to maximize the benefits. These activated benefits last for about an hour.)

This has to do with a reaction that takes place within the garlic. It’s not dangerous to serve garlic you chopped yesterday for example, but the active benefits won’t be nearly as effective.

-Always follow dosing guidelines.

*I often mix some in with puréed vegetables, (not ideal for benefits but a lot of people do it) I pre-measure it in this case, but I also don’t stress because my dog would need more garlic than she could ever eat to actually make her sick.

Dosing is everything

The general rule of thumb here is:

• 10 to 15 pounds – half a clove of garlic

• 20 to 40 pounds – one clove

• 45 to 70 pounds – two cloves *many stop at two for all weights but some add

• 75 to 90 pounds – two and a half cloves

• 100 pounds or more – three cloves

Or

  • 1/6 tsp for 5 lbs
  • 1/3 tsp for 10 lbs
  • 1/2 tsp for 15 lbs
  • 2/3 tsp for 20 lbs
  • 1 tsp for 30 lbs

Many people also recommend rotating one week on, one off, or every other day. I also use slightly less than the recommended dose.

Conclusion

I am still wary of the health warnings but try to stay on top of new research. So far hard evidence of harm seems to be lacking… significantly. One recent development was that the “major” study that supplied the information about garlic causing red blood cell damage, (that flooded the internet!) was done on literally four dogs that were given very high doses (25 cloves for a 50 lbs dog per DAY!)… plus afterward it was determined that they were totally fine. So… so far the benefits seem to outweigh the concerns and the holistic community has been using it for a very long time with great success.

We tend to use garlic seasonally, when I want to give my dog an immune boost but I know a lot of people who use it daily. As always, it is best to ask a holistic vet about holistic things, plus one who knows your pet.

It is definitely something to consider especially with winter coming up!

Dog Supplements: What’s really necessary?

This is a topic I speak about a lot because it’s a question every dog owner comes across. In an effort to not be too redundant, I’m going to try to keep this answer short and to the point.

I break supplements into two main categories:

Maintenance supplements for healthy dogs and

Treatment supplements for dogs that have some kind of issue to treat.

For healthy dogs, the question I get most often is: If you give your dog balanced whole foods, why does your dog need supplements?

The short answer is: She doesn’t. If we were to lose all of our supplements today there’s a good chance she would be ok. I supplement because even whole foods can be deficient in certain things and I do it to prevent future health conditions.

I study supplements on a daily basis and I share what I learn. I don’t give my dog every supplement I research because it would simply be too much.

There is only one supplement that I consider truly necessary for healthy dogs and that is:

FISH OIL

Fish oil is the only thing that she really needs to thrive and cannot produce on her own or get from her food. (Omega 3 essential fatty acids) Even if I were to feed her fish, it simply would not be enough. Because fish oil can potentially also be TOXIC if not sourced correctly, this plays a huge role in it being beneficial.

My favorite article about this is Facts about omega supplements

I also go into more detail about this in a few article but especially here: Fish oil and joint supplements

After fish oil come the non-essential staples for us which are:

Coconut oil

Multi-vitamin

Green mineral supplement and a

Probiotic

I write more about this here: Our supplements

And here: How much is too much?

Sometimes we add things and/or skip days but these are our most important ones.

The number one thing to consider when choosing supplements, is finding a source that you trust. A good holistic vet can help a lot with that as well as what your dog’s unique needs may be. I know a lot of people can’t get this, especially right away so unless there are health issues, there are many holistic vets on-line that offer great information. I choose to follow Dr. Peter Dobias

Dr. Karen Becker is another great choice.

Due to the over-saturation of the vitamin market, it can be incredibly overwhelming to have to find this information out all on your own. There’s so many opinions about everything and many of them are not coming from vets! Following a good holistic vet on-line is the next best thing to in person and it helps weed through the conflicting opinions and information.

For healthy dogs this may be all they ever need. For dogs with health conditions however, I believe a direct consult is a lot more important. I am passionate about holistic vet care because I’ve seen it work miracles in cases where traditional medicine simply fell short. Things such as:

Arthritis

Kidney failure (renal disease)

Liver toxicity and even

Cancer

Have been treated successfully in this way where all the tradition medicine could offer was symptom reduction and pain management. This is why I always suggest holistic care to people who have dogs with chronic conditions. It allows them to have the opportunity to treat the underlying causes of things and achieve full recovery. There are many testimonials of this and every case is different, but especially in the early stages of things, it’s always worth looking into. This is where supplements can go from beneficial to life saving and part of what keeps me writing!

Supplements: How much is too much?

In a perfect word, we would not need supplements. In the world we LIVE in however, it has been pretty widely accepted by the medical community that we simply aren’t getting everything we need from our food any more. We can help ourselves tremendously by buying the best food we can but there are still certain things that can benefit us enormously in a GOOD food-based supplement. I know a lot of raw feeders are very much against this when it comes to dogs but I can’t be so certain animals eating even the “best grass” are truly maximizing my dogs health so my philosophy is simple: if it’s safe and beneficial, I’m going to add it. That being said, “safe” includes really understanding the fact that 1 safe thing + 1 safe thing can = an unsafe thing. That’s the tricky part. When the list grows too high all the safe things added together can be dangerous so I really do my best to research not only the product itself but the effects other products can have with it. It’s daunting because we don’t quite frankly KNOW what all of these effects can be, new studies are coming out all the time and there’s a lot of contradicting evidence. For peace of mind I try to get all of my supplements from one place and follow a (good) DOCTOR’S very specific advice about them. I am grateful for this and I try to pass on some of what I learn here. I however, am not a Dr., so I am always trying my best to learn as much as I can especially about the things I can’t ask a professional. Fortunately with most of the supplements I use there is actually little danger because they are considered benign and food based but yesterday when I read an article and started looking into aswaganda for dogs, I realized I had really better hold off on that because it’s entering a different class of supplements. (I’m not saying this is bad at all it’s just not something I know about yet so it’s my example here)

I also realized the other day that some things that I don’t consider supplements, actually are and I need to broaden my research there. One example is raw goats milk. I just heard literally for the first time ever that raw goats milk fed with apple cider vinegar (often in bone broth) or coconut oil is not dangerous but they can cancel each other out! I was shocked because I do that ALL the time! It’s like dessert for my dog and it looks like now it’s gonna have to be breakfast!

(I will pass on the rest as I find them!)

I study these things a LOT and never heard it so it’s concerning but it also made me realize that I will never stop learning. I try to stick with Dr.s recommendations only and always stay in the “safe” range when it comes to mistakes because they’re unavoidable but if I’m not messing with things that are too potentially dangerous my mistakes are worth the benefits from things done right.

*I should also note that virtually all kibble has added synthetic vitamins so even without supplements, giving kibble includes the worst kind of supplements because they are not made from real food. Just ONE example of the dangers here is: “while it’s virtually impossible for real food to cause vitamin A toxicity synthetic vitamin A toxicity is well published and probably a lot more common that you might think” there are countless other examples but this is just one example of the importance of sourcing.

I am still excited to learn about all the benefits of a healthy diet. Supplements can sometimes be more “fun” because research is intriguing, it’s why people do it, and it is more fun to write about the benefits but I will start to try to look more into side effects or interactions as well, including the less mentioned ones.

To answer the question of how much is too much, for myself, I think it just boils down to common sense.

We have 6 from a Dr. (That includes a multivitamin, green mineral powder, dental kelp, probiotic, fish oil and coconut oil) that are all fine together and we skip days sometimes. She’s not sick so I only occasionally add fermented fish, raw goats milk or turmeric. I try to cover my bases and not use anything unnecessary. If she has an issue I research and then take my research to a professional.

I guess I want to say that because I write a lot about these things but I don’t want to come off sounding like I’m giving my dog 97 supplements a day and being irresponsible. I truly just mean well and try to help pass on things I find in an effort to help someone. Having a sick dog is one of the most heartbreaking things to ever go through so my effort is all done for that reason.

For some peace of mind for pet parents who are trying to make their pets nutrition more complete, here is an excerpt from an article written by a doctor on the subject:

“Are you confused about which supplements dogs need? Do you find conflicting information? Would you like to know what to give your dog without giving too little or too much? I understand your pain. People often contact me because they are not sure what their dog needs. Some believe that good food is enough and others have their kitchen counter taken over by dozens of bottles of supplements and pills.

Follow nature

It always fascinates me that the human species spends an incredible amount of time and resources to create systems that replace the natural ones. A good example is using chemical fertilizers versus the natural cycle of recycling nutrients.

In nature, a tree loses leaves to feed its roots, cows eat grass to later fertilize it with manure. In other words, all the nutrients that come from the soil are returned back to the soil. At least this is how it was before humans got involved.

Agriculture and food production is one of the glaring examples of humans trying to reinvent the wheel. For nearly a century, we have tried to replace the already perfect nutrient cycle with our own that is flawed and ridden with toxic chemicals causing further damage.

Food is now transported over long distances and then put half of it in a landfill. This creates an ever increasing  deficit of nutrients in the fields where the food is grown. In order for the farmers to grow something, chemical fertilizers come into place, creating serious imbalances and dead soil that erodes easily because it contains no organic matter.

Why good food is no longer enough

I agree with those who say that “ideally” no supplements would be needed. An ideal world would be one where nutrients are recycled back into the soil and the animals would eat a bountiful variety of foods.

The problem is that our present world is miles away from ideal and nutrient deficiency is one of the most undiagnosed and serious problems connected to disease.

What the chemistry teachers forgot to teach us

Most people do not like chemistry. I must say that I used to think I didn’t like it until I saw a connection with real life.  Biochemistry is especially fascinating. Millions of biochemical reactions happen in you and your dog’s body every day and they are completely automated. No CEO, no middle management, just pure force of nature nothing short of miracles.

What the biochemistry teachers forgot to remind us is that none of these biochemical reactions can happen without all the elements – building blocks – being present. This is where it becomes clear how important nutrients are and why I am so relentless in passing the message on. This is why I love formulating supplements that replace those nutrients missing because of the wide spread irresponsible management of natural resources.

Most people do not realize that the most common causes of disease are not viruses or bacteria or even toxins but deficiencies of nutrients. That is why so many people see such miraculous recoveries of depleted and ill dogs when we simply add a few essentials that are missing.

Six mighty nutrient groups that can help cure or improve almost any disease

In principle, no matter medical condition your dog has, the first step you need to do is to correct deficiencies for the body to be able to heal.

The key nutrients are:

Minerals

Vitamins

Essential Aminoacids

Superfood Greens

Essential Fatty Acids

Probiotics

All these nutrients can be found in four essential supplements. I can already hear some people saying – but I do not want to give so much or my dog hates pills. It is like saying, I want to have roof above my head but I don’t like roof builders and shingles.

I agree, the pharma industry didn’t make it any easier because they made us associate pills with toxic drugs. I suggest you see essential supplements as food, not as “pills” or potions.

What role does each nutrient group have in your dog’s body

My goal here is to give you the gist of what these nutrients do and why they are important in keeping your dog healthy. If you need to learn more about the source of this nutrient group, click on the group name to learn more details

Minerals  – not a single mineral can be synthesized by the body. They are essential in the structural and chemical function of the body. Their deficit also creates a state of dehydration because the body cannot absorb water in sufficient amount and dehydration is at the core of premature degeneration and aging.

Vitamins are the allies of minerals. They catalyze biochemical reactions, ensure proper formation of cells, tissue regeneration and function of organ systems. For example Vitamin E is important in skin and epithelium formation, Vitamin B is essential in proper function of the nervous system.  We now know that food grown with the use of artificial fertilizers have lower vitamin content.

Essential Amino acids are more complex then minerals, they are the building blocks of proteins, hormones and tissues. The are called essentials because the body cannot make them and they are also irreplaceable when it comes to health.

Super Food Greens – your dog knows how important superfood greens are because he or she eats grass. Some people think that grass eating is a sign of disease in dogs but it is not true. Grass or chlorophyll rich substances are important in neutralizing toxins, cleansing the digestive tract and have an anti-cancer effect.

Essential Fatty Oils come either from plants, seeds, fish or krill. These nutrients are rich in Omega 3 and Omega 6. There is a difference in opinion if plant-based oils are a sufficient source of EFA’s in dogs. If in the wild, dogs would be getting them from the prey animals, their digestive tract content and also fish. I suggest avoiding fish oil blends that appear to be high in mercury (a heavy metal) and strontium (a radioactive element that comes from radioactive pollution in Japan).

Probiotics – I often say with a pinch of humor nothing makes a dog lover happier than a perfect number two, but there is more to probiotics (the beneficial inessential flora) than perfect number two. Probiotics strengthen and condition the intestinal tract and especially the colon where eighty percent of the body’s immune function resides. They have also a positive effect on neutralizing toxins such us BUN ( blood urea nitrogen), which is a toxic by-product of protein metabolism.

How many supplements are too many?

Finally, I am getting to answer this frequently asked question. It is very apparent from nature that living organisms are extremely capable of selecting nutrients that they need and throwing away the ones that are in excess. The body does it without any outside regulation and with ease.

The problem of excess nutrients only arises when synthetic chemicals are offered instead of food based concentrates and supplements. These supplements including synthetic vitamins and minerals can correct symptoms of severe deficiency – for example scurvy – Vitamin C deficiency and Beriberi vitamin B1 hypovitaminosis. However,  synthetic non-food based supplements can create severe excesses and overdoses. Good examples are fat soluble vitamins ADEK or overdoses of minerals in chemically manufactured mineral supplements. I frequently see this in hair tests done on dogs.

The body is designed to process food based nutrients and not chemicals which can easily create a state of excess often expressed in agitation, heat production and digestive problems. These are the main reasons why I only recommend naturally-fermented vitamins, probioticsplant-based minerals and naturally-sourced omega oils that are powerful, yet gentle and can be managed by the body well.

One can experience the difference between taking a cheap synthetic multivitamin that commonly causes stomach upsets when taken on empty stomach and a naturally fermented multivitamin that usually does not cause such symptoms.

Nature never “measures’ the exact amounts of vitamins and nutrients in food. It just provides nutrients that are natural and non-synthetic.

There are two major and very common problems in nutrition and the origin of premature aging and chronic disease:

1. Deficiency of nutrients and vitamins.

2. Supplementing them in artificial forms. 

A few more things to remember

Now when you know, what each of these nutrient groups is good for there are a few things that you need to know.

Go for natural. Food can’t be grown in the lab and neither can vitamins. Many people have still no idea that most vitamins on the market are made from coal or crude oil. These products create chemical imbalances. I use only naturally cultured certified organic multivitamins because they do not cause nausea when they are ingested and the body is capable of absorbing and processing them more efficiently because they are real food.

Go for capsules or powder and ditch tablets whenever possible because tablets contain additional bonding agents and are heat processed. Capsules are better for less stable supplements such as probiotics and EFA’s because they are less likely to oxidize when capsulated.

Go for glass packaging because plastic leaches into the product and may have a long-term negative effect on the body and our environment. Glass is natural packaging made of silica – one of the most common elements in earth’s crust.

Go for quality and do your math. Some manufacturers may try to convince you that they can make and sell an all natural product for fifteen or twenty dollars. In reality, it is impossible unless they source second-grade quality ingredients from China or use artificial ingredients or fillers.

Remember essential supplements are not drugs or pills but nutrients that used to be present in food but are now often missing because of intensive agriculture.

Supplementing these six nutrient groups in four essential supplements is the foundation of treating or preventing any disease for dogs of any age. Nature does not make a difference between puppies, adults and seniors. As soon as puppies are weaned they should be getting food and essential supplements.”

Dr. Peter Dobias

For more information visit:

https://peterdobias.com/blogs/blog/15072565-how-many-supplements-are-too-many-for-your-dog